Adjectives that should describe your marketing

The thing that has drawn me most to marketing, is the opportunity that it provides to be creative and strategic, and the different aspects of the field that allow those things. Eventually, Red Gal’s will be be a service that helps small businesses learn how to successfully use a multifaceted approach to marketing and brand-building. That’s why I got so excited when I read an article on Entrepreneur that solidified my idea that  marketing should not solely focus on one element such as advertising, email marketing or PR, but rather the combination of elements that make sense for a given brand. I believe that in order for your marketing efforts to yield the results that you wish for, your efforts much span a range of channels and be based on simple, interesting, benefit-defining, consumer-friendly, channel-relevant strategy that funnels down through every aspect.

Simple.
People think all day, everyday. Don’t make them think too hard when it comes to digesting your marketing efforts. Find a way to be interesting and creative without losing the consumer along the way. Also, simple efforts will help your team internally. A simple game plan that defines the individual roles of each part, but that also explains the plan as a whole will lessen confusion internally and lead to an end-result that the consumer can understand and connect with.

Interesting.
You can be simple without being boring. Every space imaginable is cluttered with cool images, funny videos, and clever copy. Your efforts have to get you recognized. They have to make you stand out and interest the consumer in a way that grabs their attention and holds on to it, and better – makes them want more and sends them telling other people about their experience with your brand.

Benefit-defining.
In all of the fluff, what are you actually trying to say? Sure your campaign is cool, but why should the consumer pay attention, why should they buy in to whatever it is that you’re trying to market? Don’t BS the consumer, just tell him or her what solution the product or service is providing – simply and interestingly.

Consumer-friendly.
This is different from simple. Do your efforts sit well with the consumer? Do they make the consumer comfortable with your brand, do they make the consumer trust your brand, do they help the consumer connect with your brand? Are you meeting the consumer on his or her terms? 80% of the way? Half-way? Or does the consumer have to seek you out?

Channel-relevant.
Do your efforts make sense for the medium/channel in which they are presented? Marketing efforts can’t be “one size fits all.” Social will have a different tone from e-mail marketing, just as advertising campaigns will have different content from educational newsletters.

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